Guest Blogger and Designer, Mary Hoover, Reveals How Her Slow Stitching Life Keeps Her in the Present


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A Slow Stitching Journey Focusing on the Enjoyment of the Process Without the Anticipation of Moving on to the Next Thing.

by Mary Hoover, Fourth & Sixth Designs

How you behave in one aspect of your life is evidence of how you behave in all aspects. That’s what I believe.

The Slow Stitching Movement, for me, is a reflection of how I try to live my life as a whole.

Simply put: Mindfulness

Mindfulness is being present in your life and not living in the future or the past. I try to be present for all of it, even the seemingly-insignificant things. Being present isn’t something that came to me naturally, it’s something I had to learn.

Flashback to 1992: I’ve just moved to a new city 4 hours away from my family and my only job is being a mom to 3 month and 17 month old daughters. The figuring-it-out stages of being a mom are over and I feel that I finally have time in my life for creative expression. I have the freedom to pursue basically anything I want. So, what should I do with myself?

Like a lot of people, I went with something familiar. There are five girls and one boy in my family including me, and at age 10 we all learned to use my Mom’s Singer called Brownie (yes, it was brown; a creative name indeed). I guess you could have called it a right of passage in the Bryson family. I realized quilting was the only art form that wasn’t entirely foreign to me. I gave it a shot.

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 I’m the short one in front.

Well, I gave it more than a shot. I bought fabric, I bought my first sewing machine, I made cardboard templates, and I signed up for a class at the local high school. The whole nine yards, you might say. You could also say that I was hooked from the start. I finished all the blocks for the twelve-week class in only a month. I killed myself trying to match every block perfectly and get every seam just right. Then when I was finished I made the same quilt again. I was an overachiever, to be sure. I found that not only did I have the patience for the tedium that quilting requires, I thrived on it. I had found my drug.

It’s a familiar story with many quilters and creative people. The sleepless nights, those times when you forget to eat, the utter obsession with the craft. I found myself wondering why quilt shops aren’t open 24 hours. Doesn’t everyone need brown thread at 2:00 in the morning? I was the one asking myself these questions and sewing as though my life depended on it. Driven by the fear that if I didn’t finish my quilt by the next day then I would forget all the designs and ideas I have planned for the next five, ten, fifty quilts I have in my head. I was sewing with such urgency that before I knew it I had quilt anxiety. Even my dreams were plagued with seam rippers and rotary cutters.

“Mindfulness is being present in your life and not living in the future or the past.”

Early on it occurred to me that this behavior was less than healthy. There had to be a way to maintain my level of passion without being so stressed. I knew there was a problem, that something I was doing wasn’t right, but recognizing the presence of a problem is only half the battle. And that’s when I stepped back and decided to take it easy. As a result, my stress diminished, my quilts were given the time and care that they deserved, and I was happier and healthier. The end.

Oh, wait. I did the opposite of that. I got involved in the quilting world as a professional. I became an entrepreneur and opened up a quilt shop on my own. I made the majority of the samples for the shop myself. I averaged a quilt top a week and ended up having to plan events months ahead of time. I simply had no time to live in the moment. Next, my sister and I started Fourth and Sixth Designs. Now at least I had someone to share my obsession. We became authors and began frequently traveling around the US to teach and lecture and to sell our wears at Quilt Market. We had quite a bit on our plates. Eventually, something had to give.

“The Slow Stitching Movement, for me, is a reflection of how I try to live my life as a whole.”

After eight years, I closed the shop and gave some thought to hanging up my rotary cutter altogether. My life lacked balance, I realized, and I decided to seek that out. I thought through why I loved quilting in the first place, and wondered why all of this wasn’t bringing me satisfaction. I really do love all aspects of making a quilt (except binding, I consider that a necessary evil). I love choosing fabric, washing it, pressing it, folding, cutting, sewing, all of it.

So, what I discovered was that the answer wasn’t to give up the business or give up the hobby. What I needed to do was segregate my personal quilting desires from my professional ones.

I focused first on the personal side. I started making quilts just for myself again. Completing the ideas that had been in my head but I never found the time for. In a matter of months I felt just like I did back in 1993, but without the anxiety and stress. One quilt in particular helped me immeasurably with this.

 

Anniversary Stamp 4

 110”x110”

 

I made this postage stamp quilt for my husband for our 25th wedding anniversary. I named it “The Anniversary Stamp” for that reason. I had asked him several years previous if he had any requests for quilts. Our house is full of them, but I had never actually made one specifically for him. He asked for a postage stamp quilt. In hindsight it was the perfect challenge: there was no time limit, it was complicated and inevitably time-consuming and I was making it for someone I loved. I collected 110 reds and 65 creams, washed and pressed each and every one of them, and cut what felt like an endless number of 1 1/2” strips. I didn’t log my hours, but it took quite a bit of time. I loved every minute of it. And I loved every tiny square and stitch I put into it.

 

Anniversary Stamp 2

Anniversary Stamp 3

 

In changing my attitude I was left with only the therapeutic experience of quilting. The enjoyment of the process without the anticipation of moving on to the next thing. I rediscovered my connection with the journey of creation. I wanted to do it rather than wanting it to be done. And to my great surprise, this attitude took care of the business side as well. No extra work was required to improve my professional life, an understanding sister/business partner doesn’t hurt. That seemingly small change had balanced out both sides.

Of the hundreds of quilts I’ve made in my life, The Anniversary Stamp is in the top four. These are a couple other slow-stitched quilts in my collection. Each of the fabrics in these two quilts were lovingly curated from my closet.

 

Triangles 5

105” x 105”

 

Triangles 2

2” trinangles

 

Triangles 7

 

Batik Log Cabin

Batik Log Cabin, 112” x112”

 

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One inch logs. Two inch center.

 

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My sister and I are bringing a little slow-stitching to the quilting world. Block of the month projects are forced slow-stitching. You can only do one block a month, and, more importantly, one block at a time. It’s a great way to remind yourself that you love the process as much as the finished piece. It’s a way to learn to work with purpose and mindfulness.

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Full Bloom 80” x 96”

 Sewing is meditation for me, and it easily can be for you too. Solutions to many problems, both personal and professional have come to me while sitting in front of my Bernina. Be present. There is so much to enjoy in your life and you don’t want to miss it. It’s not the destination, it’s the journey. Unless your destination is the Grand Canyon, then I guess it is the destination.

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     About Mary Hoover 

Mary and her sister, Barbara Persing, are award-winning quilt artists, and their quilts have been published in many quilting magazines.  Born the fourth and sixth children in a close-knit family in south New Jersey, their mother taught these Jersey girls the art of garment sewing at the young age of ten.

Mary began quilting in 1992 when she moved to upstate New York. As a stay-at-home mom, she needed a creative outlet and immediately knew quilting was the answer. She began teaching quilting classes in 1993 and opened a quilt shop in 1999.

Despite living 300 miles apart, Barbara and Mary began collaborating shortly after the start of their own businesses. This collaboration quickly became a partnership that has grown into the pattern and design company, Fourth & Sixth Designs. Check it out at www.4and6designs.com. Take a look at their book titles and patterns and their new fabulous batik fabrics for Island Batik, too!

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If you have any questions about today’s post, please email Mary at mail@4and6designs.com.   Fourth & Sixth Designs  are available at 4and6designs.com. There you can enjoy their newsletter and blog. “However,” says Mary, “we are slow newsletter and blog writers. Please forgive us.”

 



 guest-blogger

We would love for you to share your creative process, thoughts, feelings and your place in The Slow Stitching Movement.

Just email Mark Lipinski at:  slowstitching@slowstitching.com

He will email you the simple guidelines for posting your own blog here and introducing yourself to the world of Slow Stitchers!


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The Slow Stitching Movement in FabShop News

 

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Quilting celebrity, designer, and shop owner (http://www.thequiltcompany.com), Karen Montgomery, wrote a terrific article in the current FabShop News (http://www.fabshopnews.com) about The Slow Stitching Movement (www.slowstitching.com).

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If you get a second, pick it up. It’s written from a very interesting and insightful perspective. Also don’t forget to listen to Karen’s Podcast at http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html. Mr. Electric loved it (as did I)

Guest Blogger: Bead & Fiber Artist, Teacher, and Slow Stitcher, Lisa Binkley, On Connecting with Ourselves and Others! PLUS Popular Designer, Karen Montgomery, Shares Slow Stitching on our Podcast!


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Connecting through Slow Stitching

by Lisa Binkley

Back in my teens and early 20s I had sincere and romantic notions about a hand-made life. I excitedly awaited my post-college days and the joys of creating everything from baskets and candles to rugs, quilts, and fresh hot bread all by hand and on a regular basis. Perhaps I could even grow flax or raise sheep to spin and then dye fibers with plants I grew. I’d weave and knit my silken threads into simple but elegant cloth and use it to hand stitch much of what would be my classic, tasteful, but artsy wardrobe. My imaginings were bliss-filled. I’d even have a big furry wolf-dog, maybe named Rontu, like Island of the Blue Dolphins.

Image 01--Dye experiments for slow stitch blog 0315

All I had to do was finish college and take on full-time work while managing life and a modest two-bedroom apartment with my husband to realize that my dreams were far more expansive than my time and energy. That was a helpful dose of reality, but my love of making things by hand and my fondness for the physical and psychological benefits of hand work haven’t diminished in the nearly 30 years since college.

During those years I might have been called an Earth Mother who wanted to do it all; today I call myself a Slow Stitcher and eco-dyer, and I’ve focused my energies and passions on cloth, thread, and beads (plus reading, gardening, and walks in the woods). I’m thrilled to make connections with other like-minded fiber folk through the Slow Stitching Movement that Mark Lipinski has brought to the fore for us. While I may not be making everything at home by hand in the way I dreamed about 30 years ago, I am happily a professional fiber artist and teacher as well as the mama of a big furry puppy and two other beloved dogs over the past 15 years.  (I also have a very supportive husband and two nearly grown kids J.)

Image 02--Dogs for Slow Stitching blog post 0315

Since at least the 1970s and throughout much of the developed world, people have been rediscovering the joys and beauty of cloth stitched by hand. Objects that were once strictly functional and made solely with useable leftovers are now revered works of art selling in exclusive galleries and displayed in museums. Japanese boro, Bengali kantha, Amish quilts, and the Quilts of Gee’s Bend all come to mind as just a few of the beneficiaries of this renewed interest.

For centuries everyday people with many demands and few resources created clothing and bedding for their families with what they had at hand. In northern Japan fishermen’s jackets and futon covers took the form of layered and patched “boro” (“rags” in English) in indigo blues with bits of black, gray, and brown. (Those were the only colors peasants were allowed to dye their cloth.) The layers and patches of these cotton and hemp utilitarian textiles were stitched together with dense running sashiko stitches.

Heavily embroidered quilts called kanthas were made by women in the Bengal region (Bangladesh and West Bengal, India). Kanthas were and still are created from rags, useable sari and other garment remnants, and more recently larger pieces of cloth connected by dense running stitches.

In the west, from the early European immigrants in North America, through Amish communities in the central and eastern U.S., to retirement villages and quilt guilds of today, stitchers have layered cloth and batting to create functional quilts.

“Slow Stitching is a way for us to connect to stitchers of the past.

We are moving in the same physical ways and sometimes creating the same types of objects that others have been hand stitching throughout human history.”

On a more decorative level and often using finer materials, embroiderers throughout Europe and the U.S. have created hand-stitched liturgical textiles and garments for heads of state for centuries. African nations have rich and varied traditions creating spectacular wearable objects with beads and their own printed cloth. Several Central American countries have rich traditions of colorful reverse-appliquéd mola and hand embroidered clothing, and many eastern European and Asian nations have remarkable embroidery traditions as well.

As a teacher who is often working with students on bead embroidery, I love to share with my students the latest research about bead history. Beads have been in use on every inhabited continent for hundreds or even thousands of years. Recent research dates the earliest beads (perforated teeth and shells) as far back as 100,000 years. So as we sit in class and scoop up and then stitch one bead at a time, we are doing what others have been doing for perhaps 100,000 years. I love being part of that continuous living heritage.

Image 03---MT14 teaching

By visiting museum exhibitions of any of these types of historic stitched objects we connect with hand stitchers of the past. By looking at their utilitarian objects as art, I believe we also honor the time, energy, and skill embedded in those everyday objects. The hand stitchers who made these objects may or may not have been deliberately slow and mindful in their work, but my guess is that many of them were at least some of the time. Although they were often doing work about which they had no choice, I do believe that there were periods of joy and peace experienced in the quiet rocking stitches of, say, needle and white thread on deep indigo-blue cotton or a circle of quilters around a frame helping to bring a quilt top to life.

Closer to home, many of us remember with fondness the sweaters, dresses, afghans, quilts, and even doll clothes our mothers or grandmothers made for us when we were young. These memories help us stay connected to and feel the love of past generations. It was my two grandmothers who taught me how to crochet and embroider, and they and my mom taught me to sew. One of my grandmothers and I shared a love for rich, soft pastels. Whenever we’d be together and see something in periwinkle, mauve, or soft grey-green she’s say “those are our colors.”

As she was passing away in the summer of 2008 I was working on a small embroidered quilt I titled “Passing Through.” Working in “our colors” through the slow, meditative process of hand embroidery with silk threads and glass beads helped me so much to feel connected to her even as I was losing her. I also felt like the stitching, much of which she had taught me to do, was a way of commemorating her. That 11” x 14” quilt hangs framed in my bedroom today, and it still makes me think of her whenever I look at it.

Image 04--Passing Through

Slow Stitching is a way for us to connect to stitchers of the past. We are moving in the same physical ways and sometimes creating the same types of objects that others have been hand stitching throughout human history.

Slow Stitching is a way to connect with people we have loved and lost or with people we don’t often see. Grandmothers who taught us to stitch or old friends who shared techniques or supplies and now live far away are still with us as we stitch and remember them.

I am fortunate to be a member of two hand-stitching groups: a group of bead artists that meets monthly in the Chicago area and a hand-stitching group called the Memory Cloth Circle that meets weekly to stitch and share. In both groups there is often a mix of silent stitching as well as talking, laughing, sharing ideas and feedback, and encouraging one another. What a joy it is to have even a short time of silent hand stitching in the company of other hand stitchers. As each person works deliberately and mindfully on her or his own work, there is an energy that moves about the space and connects us to each other. I highly recommend trying silent hand stitching with some of your stitching friends or fellow guild members.

I also recommend using the technology that exists today to connect with other stitchers. Two good friends and I “meet” fairly regularly to Skype, sip, and stitch. One of us is in northern California and the other two are in separate communities in southern Wisconsin. Every few weeks we chat over Skype, drink coffee, and hand stitch, often in our jammies. We show each other what we’re working on and ask for advice sometimes, but we also just keep stitching throughout the conversation. The movement of hands stitching is a natural part of the gathering and the experience.

“Tuning in to our senses as we slowly stitch allows us to have a fuller,                                         richer experience of creating.

We are seeing not only the colors, shapes, and textures of our materials and stitching but getting to watch our stitching come to life one stitch at a time.”

Slow Stitching is a way to connect with our physical selves. While stitching slowly we can connect with our senses. Touch the thread with which you stitch. Notice the thickness or thinness and smoothness or roughness of the thread. Is it smoother in one direction than the other? What is your reaction to the texture?

Feel the fabric on which you stitch. Notice its thickness, texture, weight, and drape. Can you tell what type of fiber it is solely by its feel? Part of the joy in hand work is the tactile experience of not only seeing but also intimately handling beautiful materials.

In Annie Dillard’s book The Writing Life she describes a “joyful painter” she once knew. “I asked him how he came to be a painter. He said, ‘I liked the smell of the paint.’” I had a similar aha moment watching Native American bead artist Teri Greeves stitching on the PBS series Craft in America. She was stitching on brain-tanned deer hide and I could hear her needle “pop” through the hide followed by the distinct sound of thread passing through stiff material. I thought “I love that sound,” and I knew I had chosen the right profession.

Image 05--Craft in America origins

Tuning in to our senses as we slowly stitch allows us to have a fuller, richer experience of creating. We are seeing not only the colors, shapes, and textures of our materials and stitching but getting to watch our stitching come to life one stitch at a time.

Marvel at your hands. Notice not only the movement of your hands but the bend of individual fingers and the perhaps subconscious way you do things like control thread tension with your non-stitching hand. I just recently realized that I hold my loose bead embroidery thread in the same way I control yarn tension while crocheting. But I had been doing it completely subconsciously simply because I’ve done it for decades. When I slowed down and paid attention to my bead embroidery I realized I was using the same method of tension control, and I was able to share that technique with my students.

Notice the way muscle memory and control grow as you do more hand stitching, and marvel at the way your hands “know” where to stitch up through your fabric. How do your fingers know, within 1/32nd of an inch or less, where to stitch up from the back side of the work? It really is a marvel and something we might never notice without slowing down and stitching mindfully.

Image 06--L stitching Recapitulata

Among the many other ways we can make connections through Slow Stitching, perhaps the most meaningful to me is connecting with how we experience time. Practitioners of meditation often talk about having an experience of stepping outside of time or a feeling of expansiveness that makes time slow down or stand still. The same can be experienced with mindful Slow Stitching.

In Justin Cronin’s book The Passage he describes a kind of mystical character “…taking up her needle and thread to sew… It was slow work, satisfying in the way of all things that require time and concentration…” Slow Stitching can certainly be that for each of us—satisfying work to which we give our time and concentration. In return, we can receive an experience that’s been called “bliss” by some and “flow” by others—being completely and happily absorbed in work with our hands, and for a peaceful time we are completely removed from the rest of the world and all that it asks of us.

When I was in early elementary school my mom began calling me her turtle, perhaps because it was the kindest word she could find to use. She’d often send me to my room to get ready for school or visiting grandparents or church. She’d come up an hour later to find me sitting on the floor half dressed and drawing or stitching. I’d simply gotten distracted by something that appealed to me and had gotten lost in the flow of the work of my young hands.

Image 07--Floating_and_ Grounded

Over the years I’ve found that I connect with turtles in other ways. I can’t think of a more wonderful place to spend my time than places where land and water meet. I like to sit back quietly and watch the world from a kayak or a sunny perch—perhaps a branch overhanging a stream.

Image 08--Going In

Like turtles, I’m built more for comfort and protection from the elements than for speed, but that’s okay. Turtle expert, writer, and artist David Carroll shares similar experiences in his books. In Self-Portrait with Turtles Carroll writes these gems: “…the more slowly I moved, the longer I kept still, the more I would see…” “Process was more important than completion…” “Solitude and silence intensified my seeing…” and my favorite, “In a blur of past and present, drifting into the now, I endeavored to shift into turtle time, the time within time that is neither past nor present but the ongoing now.” Surely we can cultivate these same types of experiences through Slow Stitching.

Image 09--On the Path

Slow Stitching helps us to make connections in so many ways. Through it we can connect with hand stitchers of past centuries and far-away places. We can feel the kinship and nearness of beloved friends and family members we have lost or who are far away. We may be able to connect with other slow stitchers in our own communities and form new friendships and opportunities for sharing. And we can use our Slow Stitching to connect with ourselves—the physical experiences of our hands and senses and the way we experience at least moments of the days we are each given.


   Lisa-Binkley   About Lisa Binkley

Lisa Binkley holds a B.S. in Textiles & Design from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Master’s in Urban Planning from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.Formerly a public policy analyst, she has maintained an active fiber art studio since 2000 and exhibits her award-winning work nationwide. Her work has been selected for inclusion in major exhibitions by guest curators from the Smithsonian Art Museum, Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Bellevue Arts Museum, among others. Exhibitions include American Quilters’ Society, International Quilt Association, Crafts National, CraftForms, and several years of the Wisconsin Artists Biennial. Lisa and her artwork have been featured on local and national television, in internationally-distributed books and magazines, and in many local publications. Her art is represented in private and corporate collections. Lisa enjoys sharing her passion for fiber and beads through her artwork, classes, and lectures, and she teaches throughout the U.S. She lives in Madison, Wisconsin with her husband, their two children, and their sweet fuzzy dog.

Visit Lisa’s website by clicking here: www.lisabinkley.com 

 Visit Lisa’s blog by clicking here: http://www.lisabinkley.typepad.com

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THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT PODCAST

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Karen Montgomery is a nationally recognized quilt teacher, fabric, notions, and quilt designer!  Her shop The Quilt Company was established in 1993, included in Quilt Sampler Magazine in 1997 and featured as one of America’s Favorite Hometown Quilt Shops by McCall’s Quilting in 2010. It is the largest shop in western Pennsylvania. Located in the Pittsburgh area, the shop showcases Karen’s fabric designs for Timeless Treasures, her original patterns and the Quick Trim Ruler she designed for Creative Grids.  Karen’s projects can be found in catalogs and magazines around the world.  Visit Karen’s website at: http://www.thequiltcompany.com/home.aspx

Karen Montgomery’s Slow Stitching Movement Podcast is Posted on

 THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT WEBSITE PODCAST PAGE….

http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

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THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT PODCASTS

 

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Melissa Jackson isn’t famous, nor is she a stitching celebrity. She’s a needlework enthusiast who hasn’t met a fiber art that didn’t pull her in. While I met Melissa as a cross stitcher, I was surprised and delighted that her reach into the fiber arts is wide and ongoing.

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The concept of The Slow Stitching Movement wasn’t new to Melissa. She was familiar with the Slow Food Movementand appreciates the connection between slow food and slow stitching. From practicing ethical shopping, to healing and growing through her art, and practicing slow stitching in her own work, I found her insight illuminating.

Find her podcast here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

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 guest-blogger

We would love for you to share your creative process, thoughts, feelings and your place in The Slow Stitching Movement.

Just email Mark Lipinski at:  slowstitching@slowstitching.com

He will email you the simple guidelines for posting your own blog here and introducing yourself to the world of Slow Stitchers!


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Guest Blogger Lorri Lee Chambers Talks About Her Slow Stitching and Art Quilt Process


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Any Creative Dream Can Be Yours if You Just Believe and Move Forward — If Only a Little at a Time.

by Lorri Lee Chambers

I have followed the path of Mr. Mark [Mark Lipinski] for a while and checked out his Slow Stitching Movement website and the Facebook page ( loved the story about the old man knitting penguin sweaters). I related to his idea of slowing down and stitching as a process and not a result. It’s what I do. Slow stitching is my life every time I sit down to my sewing machine or to hand stitch pieces of fabric.

Hope

When my husband and I were told that the cancer he had been battling had returned, slow stitching got me through it.  It was at that time I began to my quilt, HOPE.    We were staying in a hotel in Durham and I didn’t have one sewing supply with me during this stressful time. I knew where the closest Hancock Fabrics was located, so I picked up some fabric remnants and needle and thread to keep me sane.  This was supposed to be a one-time, short trip to a fabric store for a small project.   Back at  the hotel room , we had to wait for him to have yet more tests the next day.  Instead of fuming in anger at him and the BEAST, we call cancer, I began to sew the quilt.  The quilt started out as  black and grey and pretty dark in color and tone. Like my mood, it represented my anger and fear.

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I scrounged around the hotel for the leaf shapes I used for the quilt.  I literally used leaves from the ground that I found outside of the hotel for my patterns, but after I finished the background, things were looking up and he began to feel better, That’s when I added a Big yellow sunflower in the middle of the quilt…each stitch a prayer for better things ahead. It was slow stitching through a spiritual experience, as Mark talks about in his Slow Stitching webinars and lectures.

“The quilt started out as  black and grey and pretty dark in color and tone. Like my mood, it represented my anger and fear.”

Stitching for me is therapy. Sewing is therapy, too. If I could not sew or be creative they would have to lock me away somewhere. It’s how I have learned to process my feelings.  I’m a professional quilter and the struggle to earn a living at what I do is worth it because I cannot survive any other way.  I worked on HOPE until  all hours of the night,  again in waiting room after waiting room over the next days, sharing it with other people who were going thru the pains and trials of life that my husband and I were going through.

The Jellyfish Quilt 

I have been sewing and creating Art from fabric since I was 13 years old, loving the endless possibilities of creating something from fabric.  I designed and sold  handmade  collectible teddy bears for 22 years and had to retire from that success if only to keep my hands from becoming crippled (demanding and  repetitive handwork can be a physical challenge).  It was after my retirement, that I found a new way of processing my creativity and began concentrating on creating fabric art. For the past 21-years, I have been designing and making art quilts , table runners, baby quilts and hand bead work.

“If I could not sew or be creative they would have to lock me away somewhere.”

As The Slow Stitching Movement teaches us, the more we create, the more fearless we are, the more we play at out craft, and perfect our techniques, the more creativity will come to us.  I am an example of that way of thinking.  I am completely self-taught. Of course, I do lots of reading to become exposed to and learn new techniques, but just messing around with all kinds of stuff in my studio inspires me to develop techniques of my own such as PAS (Poor Artist Silkscreen), Sheerplique, and Mini Fabric Paintings.

In June of 2014 I was talking with a Facebook friend, Paula, who lives in Hatteras, North Carolina.   She was in the throes of building her dream home and wanted something special for it.  She talked about how some of the people in her life had special quilts made for them, but lamented that she had never had one made for her.


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One day, my friend was sharing some photos that she loved (and that I found inspirational). It was a photograph of a Jelly Fish, beautiful, peaceful, and ethereal.  I wanted to make it into art, I was able to see an art quilt. I am not, nor have I ever been a traditional quilter.  I see art in the fabrics around me and somehow, magically, they can take an on a real or imagined theme, sometimes a literal shape, that can be created in tactile representation. The jellyfish quilt I had imagined in my mind’s eye had to be created from fabrics that could do her amazing colorful photo justice, including the brightness of the subject combined with the softness it demanded.  I have been working with sheer fabrics for years, in my PAS technique, and in layering fabrics , threads, fibers and scraps, turning them into new fabrics for making Artist Trading Cards and smaller art quilts.  I chose my Sheerplique technique to use with the organza I wanted to use in the piece.  I felt it was the only design choice for me, that, and no batting.  I wanted  light to come through the layers to allow the fabric to glow and dance.

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This is what became of Paula’s dream, a massive 9-foot by 7-foot art quilt, that will soon hang from the rafters of her new home. The quilt will float some 28-feet in the air and will be backlit by beach sunlight, freeing the tentacles to sparkle and sway in the ocean breezes.

This quilt is an exercise in slow stitching as its construction is a multi-layer process of getting from here to there.  So many people say,  “Ewww, organza is so hard to work with!”     Yes, that’s true, sewing organza can be a challenge and  prove to  be especially difficult when working in the immense size of this  project.  This quilt  contains 3 full layers of clear white organza, 45-inches wide by 3 1/2 -yards added to  each piece of the back layer of jellyfish.  Every creature, bubbles and seaweed is either an organza or sheer fabric.  I chose these fabrics because they would allow the light to shine through giving the jellies movement and translucence. The shadows are fused onto the white cotton background, before another layer is placed over all of it.  The “seaweed” is fused to the outer border, while I randomly placed ‘bubbles’ onto the quilt to break up the negative space captured in the original photo.   The final layer of the jellyfish’s loose tentacles are three-dimensional so that they will literally move with the movement in the room or from surf’s whisk.  All of it slow stitching, each part a process that contributed to each step of creating the entire piece with each stitch, healing, inspiring, or illuminating.

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I originally had planned to hand quilt the entire piece, but my hands said different .  I created a baby version to test the “fancy” stitches on my Brother SQ9050 whom I named, “Stitches.”  I learned a long time ago to test the “waters” and so I expanded two stitches by length and width coming up with the water stitch in white , plus the edging for the seaweed, which was completed in variegated thread.

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The stitches I chose ended up being perfect for the look I wanted (another tenet of slow stitching — discovering new ways to do creative things).

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Am I happy with it?  Oh,  yes I am.  I jumped in with a creative vision not knowing how it would turn out.  Sure, I wish could have done a few things differently in construction, but that choice was hampered by the fact that I do not have a big studio with space to lay out such a monster piece of art!   I used what I had —  a 6-foot table, a few card tables, ‘Stitches”, and the slow, intentional, and present perseverance to create what I call, “The Jelly Fish Dance,”  and also  known as “Paula’s Dream.”   Like everything we take our time on, that we prepare for, and we proceed carefully with, this quilt was birthed, as babies are, coming out of the smallest place into the world to grow into big and beautiful existence.

What a piece like this or any large piece does is makes you believe in yourself. You can do this no matter what and you can look past the imperfections.  JUST DO IT! Your end result will be loved no matter what.  We must accept the challenge and face our stitching insecurities because  it is how we grow. When we walk a creative journey, our slow stitching path may not always straight but being present during our process will take us to amazing places.

Never say Never.  Any creative stitching dream can be yours if you just believe and move forward, if only a little at a time.


   1972382_10201974273574595_276121040923577909_n   About Lorri Lee Chambers

I Love being Creative and making Art, and selling it is my way to earn a living. All of my life has been surrounded by art, from the field trips to the Smithsonian to see ancient art, the galleries to see paintings by Van Gogh, Raphael,  and Da Vinci to study the techniques, taking art classes from modern masters, and creating my own art processes. My sewing machine “Stitches” is my partner in creating my fabric paintings one piece of fabric at a time

I was first  inspired to quilt by Kaye Wood and Eleanor Burns while watching their television shows.  It was when I found  Simply Quilts and Alex Anderson that I learned a lot of my technique and developed a creative thought processes.  But I am always trying to come up with new ways to do things simply, such as I only use the 3000 yard spools of Maxil fruit punch variegated thread on my sewing machine and that is all I ever sew anything with. My mom has the prettiest hems on her slacks!  The Jelly Fish Quilt was the first time ever “Stitches” had white thread on her.

You can find Lorri’s Easy shop by clicking here:  https://www.etsy.com/shop/FairyGodmotherArts

Visit Lorri’s blog by clicking here:  http://fairygodmotherarts.blogspot.com/

I am a slow.v3



THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT PODCASTS

 

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Melissa Jackson isn’t famous, nor is she a stitching celebrity. She’s a needlework enthusiast who hasn’t met a fiber art that didn’t pull her in. While I met Melissa as a cross stitcher, I was surprised and delighted that her reach into the fiber arts is wide and ongoing.

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The concept of The Slow Stitching Movement wasn’t new to Melissa. She was familiar with the Slow Food Movementand appreciates the connection between slow food and slow stitching. From practicing ethical shopping, to healing and growing through her art, and practicing slow stitching in her own work, I found her insight illuminating.

Find her podcast here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

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The Slow Stitching Movement Podcast’s are sponsored by

Aurifil Thread and GloriousColor.com

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Listen here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

 

 



 guest-blogger

We would love for you to share your creative process, thoughts, feelings and your place in The Slow Stitching Movement.

Just email Mark Lipinski at:  slowstitching@slowstitching.com

He will email you the simple guidelines for posting your own blog here and introducing yourself to the world of Slow Stitchers!


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Guest Blogger and Veteran, David Martinez Finds Solace in Slow Stitching

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An Injury Lead Me to Slow Stitching 

by David Martinez
I am a disabled Marine Corps veteran. The Marine Corps places a lot of importance on optimal physical condition and ability, so it can be a real blow to one’s self-esteem to become disabled as a result of military life. Both my physical issues and the medication I take prevent me from holding a job outside the house. I wasn’t going to just sit back and do nothing, though. After some urging by my wife, I decided to try out knitting, and I found that I enjoyed it.

“The act of stitching has its own healing affect mentally and emotionally”  

It was a little frightening to learn something completely new when I was feeling like so much basic ability had been taken away from me. I took my time, though, and taught myself to knit from videos online. There was a lot of pausing, rewinding, taking stitches out, and starting over.
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The knitted kitties are something that I really enjoyed making. Not just the finished product, but the act of knitting them. This is also why I love the idea of slow stitching.  Slow stitching really allows me to focus on simply enjoying the moment of creation.
After a while, I tried doing some cross-stitch to see how I might like it.  I found that I actually liked it more than I did knitting, and so I wanted to do it more and more.  The simple act of making little X’s with thread is quite relaxing for me.  To a certain extent, it doesn’t even matter what the project is. As long as the actual stitching process gets me from point A to point B with a little variety thrown in.
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Because of my bad back, I need to find ways to stitch in a comfortable position. I end up doing a lot of stitching while reclining to rest. I can work on projects while watching TV and it really is a very relaxing experience.  It took a little time for me to find a position that really worked well for me, but as long as I take breaks and stretch a bit when I need to, I’m generally okay.  Slow stitching at its finest.
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I’m also a big ol’ geek.  I enjoy watching anything from Doctor Who to StarTrek to various flavors of anime.  That also shows in some of the projects that I work on.  Fandoms can be great to find inspiration for what to do with your next project.
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One of my favorite pieces to work on, though, was a sugar skull.  It took a long time to finish, but I really enjoyed every minute of it.  Watching it grow from just a mouth to something vaguely face-like to a flowery skull was a rather fun experience.  I like to be able to work on a longer tasks that I can take my time on and keep plugging away at it and watch something grow little by little.
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I’ve also really loved stitching up cross stitch patterns that my wife designs.  I am very much a pattern follower.  It’s comforting for me to just get into the flow of going along with what someone already created. While I don’t mind following patterns made by other people, there’s something special about working on a project created by your partner.
Slow stitching helped me find some of my lost confidence and has given me skills and ability to run a business with my wife from our home. Working from home on my own schedule allows me to look after my physical needs. The act of stitching has its own healing affect mentally and emotionally.

 

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    About David Martinez

 

David is one half of the Craftypodes (http://craftypodes.com). He enjoys cross-stitch and video games, and loves science fiction and fantasy. 
You can see work-in-progress pictures from Craftypodes at: http://instagram.com/craftypodes
You can also catch them on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/craftypodes

I am a slow.v3



THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT PODCASTS

 

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Stephanie Hilker is a knitter and a personality in the blogosphere at Milk-Shed.com. I loved her opinions on the good and not so good of fiber blogging, her theory on stitching mistakes, and why slow stitching may be the wave of the future.

Listen here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

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The Slow Stitching Movement Podcast’s are sponsored by

Aurifil and GloriousColor.com

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I am a slow.v3

 

 

The Slow Stitching Movement Podcast’s are sponsored by Aurifil and GloriousColor.com

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 guest-blogger

We would love for you to share your creative process, thoughts, feelings and your place in The Slow Stitching Movement.

Just email Mark Lipinski at:  slowstitching@slowstitching.com

He will email you the simple guidelines for posting your own blog here and introducing yourself to the world of Slow Stitchers!


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A Prescription for How to Begin Slow Stitching

HOW I SLOW STITCH 

A Practical Guide 

by Mark Lipinski

 

If you’re feeling creatively bare, mojo melancholy, and inspirationally barren, you need to find an antidote – and fast! For creative types like us, being in a visionary funky-dunk can feel lethal and lead to burn out, over eating, compulsive shopping, a mild depression, a messy house, anxiety, crankiness and more. Boosting your creativity, pumping up your brain power, and finding your creative self again is key to kick starting and maintaining our healthy and balanced lives.

Of course, there are those of you who might still be regularly creating, knitting or cross stitching like a bat out of hell, but maybe not with the same excitement you once brought to the creative table. If all of your stitching and projects are stating to look-alike or feel a little boring to construct, you can use some help, too. Call the Doctor. Dr. Slow, that is!

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Over the past several months, the guest bloggers, podcast interviewees, and I have talked about our creative process and just some of the benefits we have manifested from our slow stitching (I’m working on how I can use slow stitching to lose weight and, believe it or not, that’s working, too – more on that later, and the good news is I won’t have to write that blog while sitting on two chairs).

For most of us, the process of our physical movements, actions, and thoughts while working on our stitching projects is often, if not always, overlooked and that’s a shame. Being conscious of what we’re doing and exactly how we’re doing it can enhance our creativity and improve our lives, to boot! And who couldn’t use a little of that?

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We know that there are many benefits to actually slowing down your stitching process by beginning to pay attention to what, and how, we’re stitching or knitting, needlepointing, weaving, etc. Purposeful and focused immersion while stitching or craft making is like a fascinating elixir that benefits us in physical, emotional, financial, and spiritual ways.  It gives us a brand new way of looking at our work and how we approach the world in general.  Learning a slow stitching technique helps us deliver all of the many benefits that our stitching can offer us besides a just a finished project, benefits that aren’t even considered in our consume, rush, finish, unconscious world.

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Most of us start out really wanting to reap those stitching benefits of better health, deeper spiritual or meditative thought, increased creativity, a boost in brainpower, improved relationships, and more,  but don’t have the first idea of how to begin.  I had that problem, too.

 

First things first …

When I talk about intentional, slow stitching, all I’m talking about really is just taking the time to pay attention to what you’re doing, in a very deliberate, intentional, and focused way.

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For instance, when I sit down to slow stitch at my sewing machine, or prepare to embroider, needlepoint, etc., I literally take several deep breaths, get my bearings, and acknowledge my surroundings. Next I take a look at the tools and supplies I’ll be using, the best tools and fibers I can afford, and make a mental note that these things didn’t just appear magically from thin air, but were created and delivered by people from other places all around the world. I make a conscious note that I am fortunate to be able to afford such luxuries, when many people are struggling just to find clean water. It’s an attitude of gratitude.

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Sometimes I might close my eyes (as I recently asked the participants in my quilting class to do.  I wanted them to be able to feel and experience the fabrics they were sewing with.  I wanted them to understand, without looking, the weave of the fabrics, the different amounts of sizing that prepared their fabrics, the hand of their textiles, and the stretch or lack thereof, of the cottons they chose to work with.)

Taking the time to be aware of our surroundings, tools, fibers and such, no matter what we’re stitching, not only makes for a better stitching experience but slows down our process for some thinking and integrating creativity into our lives rather than just jumping in without any thought at all.

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I find that my entire stitching experience began to change once I was able to acknowledge that (without smirking or rolling my eyes – because I did that, at first) what I was working on, and the tools and fabrics I was using to work with, were a part of a global connection and not just me sewing together some cotton or embroidering some floss onto random linen.

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Okay, this may sound a little Airy-Fairy but try to stay with me, here. The acknowledgement of all of this allowed me to then focus on what I was stitching in a more focused, and even grateful way.   Trust me, I’m the least likely person to engage in any of this mumbo-jumbo, but it works.

 

It’s individual . . .

There are as many different ways and approaches to slow stitching as there are people reading this blog, and probably even hundreds more than that. With a little practice, some patience, along with the physical focused and intentional activity of stitching, you will find your own individual slow stitching groove, a technique or method that will work best for you.

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For me, I use my slow stitching as a cognitive distractor. That means I literally use my stitching to distract me from everything else that’s going on in my life.  For instance, if my son wrecked his car, I had an argument with a buddy, and I can’t seem to find the money to buy a new something or another that I need, I use my slow stitching as an escape – literally only thinking about what I am stitching, how I’m stitching it, and not allowing my mind to wander onto anything else.  No stinkin’ thinkin’ allowed.  Physically engaging in that kind of slow and repetitive stitching gives my brain and emotions a little 20-or-so-minute vacation everyday, and ultimately that space allows me to relax and regroup so that I can allow greater creativity and emotional, physical, and/or spiritual peace to enter my noggin and being.  At any point in my day, I can pick up my stitching, practice my slow techniques, and instantly be relaxed, away from life’s little moments of chaos, almost in an instant.

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A few ways that I slow stitch . . .th

I use a couple of different techniques when I slow stitch. One of those ways I call my ‘focused slow stitching.’ That means while I am consciously stitching on my projects, I allow my thoughts to only go and acknowledge my physical stitching process. When I focus stitch, I only focus on my machine’s needle or hum, the fabric running through the feed dogs, the rotary cutter on fabric, the rhythm of my knitting needles, or the physical pace of my cross stitch or embroidery, what my yarn or fabric literally feels like. I focus only on what I’m physically stitching at the moment and all of the physical sensations. If thoughts come to mind like, “I’m going to kill that kid if he forgot to pay his car insurance premium,” (and know that other thoughts will come to mind – and a lot of them) I push it aside immediately and get back to focusing only on my stitching, process, and physical feelings and sensations of the process I’m engaged in.

That’s not, however, the only way I slow stitch.

If I find myself creatively bone dry, or in a position where I might have an idea but I don’t know how to approach it, then I like a more unrestrictive kind of slow stitching.   I call it my ‘open minded slow stitching.’ All that means is that while I am paying close and focused attention to my physical stitching and my project at hand, just as if it’s the only movement in the world at the time, I am also allowing thoughts about whatever I’m in a creative quandary about, and only those thoughts that relate to the issue or question, to mentally dance in and out of my mind while I’m still physically concentrating on my stitching.

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For instance, I’ll ask myself, “Should I start a new pattern business?“ Then, I’ll start to stitch – intentionally stitch, fierce and focused. Next, I’ll allow myself to think of my question and answer it, allowing only thoughts relating to that question, while I stitch.

Here’s an example of what my thought process might be in my open kind of slow stitching. “Starting a new pattern business will take time. I need to devote two hours a day to it. That time will take me away from my family or house chores. Who will make dinner? I wonder what my husband wants for dinner? I think there are pork chops in the freezer…” STOP! Stop the conversation. We don’t care what your husband wants for dinner at that moment, do we? Gently and quickly focus your attention back to your creative process and question. Start again.

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Every time I get an intruding thought, I stop it in it’s tracks, and refocus. Honestly, there are times I might have to stop and refocus 4 or 5 times a minute or more, depending on the kind of day I’m having.

It all takes practice. We are creative and creative people having a nonlinear way of thinking. For us, linking “should I start a new pattern business?” and “I think there are pork chops in the freezer,” makes perfect sense, but it doesn’t help you creatively and it intrudes on your slow stitching process and its additional benefits.

Give it a chance . . .

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For me, practicing either of these kinds of slow stitching techniques, just twenty minutes, or so, a day allows my creative life to begin to change and expand. Add to that the daily writing of my morning process pages, and snapping a few pics that inspire me each day, and I am often  surprising myself with a new-found creativity and way of looking at the world.  It can happen for you, too.

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Now, in the interest of full disclosure, I want to let you in on something. Those 20 minutes of slow, intentional, physical stitching a day, and focused or open thinking during your stitching was torturous for me when I began. I had never done anything like that before. I hated it. I didn’t see the point. I wanted immediate results and that wasn’t happening.  And I couldn’t get through 3-minutes without thinking about hot chocolate or even the torment of cleaning my office (which often times felt preferable).

Slow stitching is a practice.  But in this case, practice does not make perfect. The good news is we’re not looking for perfection through our slow stitching. Slow stitching and it’s benefits are a part of continual and regular imperfect practice. There is no end result. No perfect way to slow stitch.  No end result.  The key to getting he most out of your stitching is making your daily process a habit. Schedule a daily regular block of time for your routine slow stitching. Simple.

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Practicing this form of slow stitching tends to distract me from everything I would normally be preoccupied with while I crocheted or stitched and it allows me to take advantage of the new creative thoughts and ideas that start just coming to me. It allows me to get out of my way to allow those new thoughts in. Focused slow stitching now puts me in a state of mind that is fertile for creative imagination.

 

 “Taking the time to be aware of our surroundings, tools, fibers and such, no matter what we’re stitching, not only makes for a better stitching experience but slows down our process for some thinking and integrating rather than just jumping in without any thought at all but the end result.” 

 

The more you put into it the more you’ll get out of it . . .

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that The Slow Stitching Movement isn’t just about our projects, what we imagine, or what we complete. Slow Stitching is a lifestyle.  That lifestyle encompasses many day-to-day activities, as well, but let’s face it, it’s pretty easy to shop locally and ethically to support our stitching and creative work where we live. It’s a piece of cake to organize and discuss our creativity with a slow stitching salon for greater creative awareness and fun. Weeding out our stash is a pain in the butt, but it’s mindless, it doesn’t ask much of us, and uncluttered drawers and rooms frees our creative space in our physical space and in our heads. Doing a bit of research on the stitchers and history of our kind of stitching in our community is almost a snap and connects us to other like-minded souls. The stitching part, the  physical process and act of slow stitching, my dears, can be bit tougher than all of the other stuff put together. Not only do we have to focus on what we are stitching, we have to learn to let go of control, frustration, blame, self-deprecation, etc., that often comes up during our stitching at the same time we’re trying to stitch!animated-student-thinking-ani_thinkingcap

Some of you will be better than others with the physicality of your slow stitching concentration and may see creative benefits right away. Others of you (like me) will always have to work at it, but the creative, physical, and emotional benefits come to us, anyway.

None of us will ‘master’ the physical act of slow stitching. There isn’t anything to master. Just stay conscious, present, and in the moment while you stitch, that’s it. I know that it sounds easier than it is. Don’t beat yourself up if you struggle. We all struggle with deep concentration, purposeful thought, and action.

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The goal is to engage with some physical, intentional slow stitching every day. Make it a habit. The more regularly you show up to slow stitch, the easier the process will become. You will connect with your daily slow stitching faster, and tap into your creative ‘zone’ almost effortlessly as you regularly practice the slow stitching process. Again, there is no such thing as perfection or perfecting the process of slow stitching. Like life, slow stitching is a process. You can’t get an ‘A’ in slow stitching any more than you can get an ‘A’ in life. Do your best, try out different ways that work for you,  and keep at it.

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I’m happy to answer any and all of your questions about Slow Stitching.  Just leave your question in the comment area of the blog and I’ll respond, or you can write to me at slowstitching@slowstitching.com!   mark

Guest Blogger, Cheryl Arkison Shares How Slow Stitching Makes Her a Better Parent

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How Slow Stitching Makes me a Better Parent

By Cheryl Arkison

I often say that having my first daughter allowed me to be who I really am. Yes, she made me a mother. But she also made me realize that to be the best mother, the best role model to her, I had to be true to myself. This meant embracing my creative side as the dominant part of me, the part that needs to be nurtured and acted on daily. I was quilting before I had my kids, but becoming a mother made me a quilter.

This relationship between motherhood and my quilting is not one-sided. Slow stitching makes me a better mother as well.

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In the moment

Quilting forces us to pay attention to what we are doing right now. Look away for a moment and you can cut off your finger tip. Trust me, I know that. One of the reasons I started quilting was that it was a complete distraction from the stress of graduate school. Because I had to pay so much attention to quilting in order to not hurt myself or make mistakes I couldn’t think about the other things that were weighing on me. Quilting was necessarily in the moment.

Kids are so In. The. Moment. Their emotions are completely linked to what is happening right here, right now. Their attention spans, generally, are focused on what is in front of them right now.

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Because I quilt I can better understand the need to be in the moment with my kids. By nature I am a multitasker, with an ability to flit around doing three things at one. Kids don’t like that. So I am much better at understanding the need to be in the moment for them, with them. Much easier to avoid getting hurt and making mistakes. Just like quilting.

Engagement

Slow stitching calls for pure engagement in what you are doing. With your attention held fast by your stitching, everything slows down.

“Take each step as it comes,

change the things that don’t work,

and be open to where things lead you.

I can’t speak for anyone else, but I know my kids are happier around me when the phone is put away, my sewing machine is not out, and the dishes are done. They want me and my attention to be on them. Of course it can’t be that way all the time – someone still has to make school lunches and fold the laundry. But we are all happier when I give them focused engagement by colouring with them, playing a game of Monopoly, or sledding down the hill with them.

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As a quilter I can create the opportunity for full engagement with my stitching. I try to keep my space tidy and ready for whatever moment of creativity I can find, for whatever activity I can fit in the day. As a mother I create the opportunity for full engagement with my kids by putting aside the phone, the stitching, the cleaning. Keeping my heart open to the moments they ask for and creating the ones they don’t ask for brings full engagement.

Intention

For me, slow stitching is about being focused on the process of what you are doing without regard to where you’ll end up. Take each step as it comes, change the things that don’t work, and be open to where things lead you. Being intentional in the moves that you make and the stitches you take is required to quilt successfully. Even improvisational piecing at the machine requires your engagement. Every choice impacts the next move.

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That sounds an awful lot like the faith and intention you have to have when it comes to raising kids.

Don’t eat breakfast, there will be a tantrum, someone will get in trouble. Skip the mitts on a cold day, don’t stay out to play after school, cranky before dinner. Then there are the bigger things, keep love from them and see them not love others. Show them kindness and they will return it.

It can put a lot of pressure on a mother, and a quilter. Where will she end up? How can I be sure of the results? You can’t be. But you can be intentional, slowing down and living in the moment. Trust in the process.

One stitch, one laugh, one quilt, one day at a time.

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   About Cheryl Arkison

Cheryl is a quilter, writer, and mom. She writes and teaches on quilting, craft, creativity, food, and family. And it all comes from her dining room empire in her crowded, colourful house. From this space she wrote her first book, Sunday Morning Quilts (co-authored with Amanda Jean Nyberg, Stash Books, March 2012) and her second book, A Month of Sundays (Stash Books, July 2013).

A Month of Sundays Cover

Happily considered a modern quilter, Cheryl’s work spans techniques. She is in love with scraps, circles, and improvisational piecing. The ability to just sit and sew is what gets her through the day, even when that sewing comes without a plan or any reason. It always comes together, eventually.

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A proud first generation Ukrainian, she is committed to not letting the artistry of food and craft from her heritage pass by unnoticed in the modern age. Cheryl is the mother of three kidlets – two gregarious girls and a baby boy. She blogs regularly on Dining Room Empire.

 

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THE SLOW STITCHING MOVEMENT PODCASTS

Liza Prior Lucy, author, designer, teacher, knitter, quilter, and business owner of www.GloriousColor.com discusses her attraction and participation in The Slow Stitching Movement in a newly posted Slow Stitching podcast.

Listen here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

 

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Eye of the Beholder designer, Margaret Willingham, talks about what slow stitching means to her, in her creativity process, finding the time, spirituality, and creating an integrated life. Find her podcast here: http://www.slowstitching.com/podcasts.html

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The Slow Stitching Movement Podcast’s are sponsored by

Aurifil and GloriousColor.com

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The Slow Stitching Movement Podcast’s are sponsored by Aurifil and GloriousColor.com

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 guest-blogger

We would love for you to share your creative process, thoughts, feelings and your place in The Slow Stitching Movement.

Just email Mark Lipinski at:  slowstitching@slowstitching.com

He will email you the simple guidelines for posting your own blog here and introducing yourself to the world of Slow Stitchers!


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